Cancer

Louisville Cancer Treatment

Patients newly diagnosed with cancer often experience tremendous anxiety about the many treatment options available. It often is difficult to navigate through a confusing maze of specialists and advice. If you are searching for a cancer expert, have been referred to a cancer expert who is a UofL Physician, or simply want to know where to get started, we hope the following information will help you.

UofL Physicians includes many cancer experts across several specialties with different areas of expertise who treat both adults and children. Still, we have a unified approach to cancer care, with multidisciplinary teams of physicians who work together to guide each patient through diagnosis, treatment and recovery. This approach is applied to many disciplines, including head and neck cancers, melanoma, gynecologic cancers, breast cancer, brain and spine tumors, pediatric cancers, cancers of the blood, gastrointestinal cancers (liver, pancreatic, esophageal, gastric cancers), lung cancer, genito-urinary cancers and others. These teams of cancer experts have an unparalleled depth and breadth of experience. They have trained at the world’s most renowned cancer centers, including M.D. Anderson and Memorial Sloan-Kettering.

Using this team-focused approach, our treatment plans reflect the combined expertise of many physicians -- surgeons, medical oncologists, radiologists, radiation oncologists and pathologists, as well as psychologists, nutritionists and physical therapists. This approach also ensures that patients who need several different therapies to treat their cancer will receive the ideal combination.

In addition, our specially trained oncology nurses care for patients before, during and after surgery; help manage clinical trials; and educate patients about what to expect when they go home from the hospital. They also communicate with family members to address their needs and concerns.

We recognize that each patient is unique and each type of cancer is different -- the best treatment for one patient may not be right for another. Thus, we develop a treatment plan tailored for each patient. But the bottom line for all the cancer experts who are part of UofL Physicians is that we treat more than our patients’ cancers -- we care for the patient as a whole person.

UofL Physicians provide a full scope of cancer services: screenings, educational programs, diagnosis, treatment, psychosocial support, pain management, rehabilitation, support for loved ones, and assistance in addressing life after cancer.

Screenings and Education

UofL Physicians understands that early detection is key to effective treatment and improved survival. We work with the Kentucky Cancer Program (KCP), located at the James Graham Brown Cancer Center, to offer a comprehensive cancer screenings program that includes mobile mammography and outreach in high-risk communities. These public and patient education programs are designed to meet the needs of many different audiences, with a wide variety of print materials, videos, online databases and special events. To learn more, please visit the James Graham Brown Cancer Center.

Diagnostic Precision

The radiologists who are part of UofL Physicians use advanced imaging technology to accurately detect cancer and pinpoint its exact location in the body. Our pathologists then analyze tumor samples to determine a precise diagnosis and the extent of each patient’s cancer, also called staging. Reports from our pathologists are essential to deciding the best course of treatment. For more information, please visit UofL Physicians-Radiology and UofL Physicians-Pathology.

Surgical Oncology Expertise

Surgery often is needed to treat some types of cancer. Surgical oncologists perform a variety of procedures including biopsy, clinical staging, placing of nutritional support or monitoring, and removal of malignant tumors. UofL Physicians’ nationally renowned surgical oncologists have pioneered many surgical innovations for optimal treatment of cancer. For more information, please visit UofL Physicians-Surgical Oncology.

Leadership in Radiation Therapy

Radiation therapy uses high-energy rays to kill cancer cells. As leaders in cancer care, UofL Physicians’ radiation oncologists offer patients the world's most sophisticated cancer-fighting technology and most proven radiation treatment techniques available. Our radiation oncologists are not only experts in radiation therapy; many specialize in a specific type of cancer. They work with physicists and technologists to plan the precise delivery of the radiation to minimize radiation to vital organs and maximize the radiation to the area affected by cancer. Because we use the most advanced technology, we are able to participate in specialized national clinical trials. For more information, please visit UofL Physicians-Radiation Oncology.

Innovative Medical Oncology

Some patients may need drug therapy to initially treat their cancer or after surgery to kill any remaining cancer cells. This usually involves a combination of two or more drugs that enter the bloodstream and travel throughout the body. UofL Physicians’ medical oncologists employ sophisticated technologies and the latest combination of therapies to provide each patient with an individual comprehensive treatment plan. They carefully monitor each patient’s treatment and provide follow-up care. They also can help patients manage the side effects of drug therapy so patients can lead relatively normal lives while undergoing treatment. For more information, please visit UofL Physicians-Medical Oncology/Hematology.

  • Adrenal tumors
  • Adenocarcinomas (a type of cancer that develops in cells lining glandular types of internal organs)
  • Appendix cancer (appendiceal carcinoma)
  • Benign tumor of glandular origin (adenoma)
  • Benign tumors of the liver (hemangiomas, adenomas, cysts, focal nodular hyperplasia)
  • Bile duct injuries
  • Bile duct tumors
  • Brain and spine tumors
  • Breast cancer (including DCIS, LCIS, ductal carcinoma, lobular carcinoma, phyllodes tumors, apocrine carcinoma and tubular carcinoma)
  • Cancer of the bile ducts (cholangiocarcinoma)
  • Cancer that develops in the hair follicles or beneath the skin (merkel cell carcinoma)
  • Chordoma
  • Colon cancer
  • Cysts
  • Eccrine carcinoma
  • Endocrine tumors
  • Esophageal cancer
  • Gastric cancer (cancer of the stomach)
  • Genito-urinary cancer, cancers that affect the urinary tract, bladder, kidneys, prostate, testicles and penis
  • Gynecologic cancer, cancers that affect the female reproductive organs – including the cervix, Fallopian tubes, ovaries, uterus, vagina and vulva
  • Head and neck cancers
  • Hematology and blood disorders
  • Hyperparathyroidism
  • Intestinal cancer
  • Liver cancer (including metastatic colon cancer, hepatocellular cancer and other metastatic cancers)
  • Liver tumors
  • Lung cancer
  • Melanoma (including in-transit melanoma)
  • Neuroendocrine cancer and tumors
  • Pancreatic cancer
  • Pancreatitis
  • Parathyroid cancer
  • Parathyroid tumors
  • Pseudomyxoma
  • Renal cancer
  • Sarcoma, which are tumors of bone and soft tissue (including dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans [DFSP], chondrosarcoma, liposarcoma, malignant fibrous histiocytoma [MFH], Carcinosarcoma, Leiomyosarcoma, angiosarcoma, Rhabdomyosarcoma, fibrosarcoma
  • Skin cancer
  • Thyroid cancer (including papillary cancer, anaplastic thyroid cancer and medullary cancer)
  • Thyroid tumors
  • Zollinger-Ellison syndrome
  • Childhood cancers
    • Leukemia (a cancer of the blood or bone marrow)
    • Lymphomas (a cancer involving the cells of the immune system)
    • Childhood solid tumors
    • Brain tumors
  • Pediatric blood disorders

Blood and Marrow Transplant Program

UofL Physicians are part of the James Graham Brown Cancer Center’s Blood and Marrow Transplant Program. The only one of its kind in the region, it is fully accredited by the Foundation for the Accreditation of Hematopoietic Cell Therapy (FAHCT). Our Marrow Donor Program registers individuals, age 18 to 60, as potential donors on the national registry.

The Oncology/Blood and Marrow Transplant Unit provides a 19-bed critical care unit at University Hospital specializing in bone marrow transplantation and high-dose chemotherapy for treatment of conditions including leukemia, Hodgkin's and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, breast cancer and aplastic anemia. To learn more, please visit the James Graham Brown Cancer Center.

Brain and Spine Tumors

Nationally, more than 100,000 people every year are diagnosed with some type of neurological cancer, which is cancer that affects the brain or spine. Roughly half of all brain tumors are cancers that have spread from the lung, breast or melanoma. UofL Physicians are an integral part of the James Graham Brown Cancer Center’s Brain and Spine Tumor Clinic. With the focused care of a multidisciplinary team, the Brain and Spine Tumor Clinic staff is making a difference in the quality and longevity of life for many of the more 300 Kentuckians each year that are diagnosed with some form of a neurological cancer. The Brain and Spine Tumor Clinic weaves together the expertise of health professionals from across the spectrum, including neurosurgery, neurology, radiation oncology, medical oncology, neuroradiology, neuro-pathology, nursing, social work, and psychology.

Patients may attend conference meetings — increasing their own education about their diagnosis, and giving the team the opportunity to work with the patient in developing a strategy and an individualized treatment plan.

Surgery

In most brain tumor cases, surgery is performed to remove as much of the tumor as possible while protecting the important parts of the brain. Sometimes, this is only to get tissue for a diagnosis, especially if the tumor is in a sensitive area of the brain. If the team concludes that surgery isn’t possible, radiation therapy or another type of treatment may be prescribed.

Radiation Therapy

Radiation therapy, also called radiotherapy, uses high-energy rays to kill cancer cells. Before you undergo radiation, a radiation oncologist and physicist plan the precise delivery of the radiation to minimize radiation to surrounding brain and spinal tissue and maximize the radiation to the affected area. For more information, please visit UofL Physicians-Radiation Oncology.

Chemotherapy

Chemotherapy uses drugs to destroy cancer cells. The drugs enter the bloodstream and travel throughout the body. Chemotherapy may be recommended to kill any remaining cancer cells following surgery or to control cancer growth and relieve symptoms. Most chemotherapy drugs are given intravenously or by catheter. For more information, please visit UofL Physicians-Medical Oncology/Hematology.

Breast Cancer

Breast cancer is the leading cause of cancer among women and the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths. The good news is that with early, accurate diagnosis and appropriate treatment, breast cancer survivors live improved, productive lives. UofL Physicians’ cancer experts provide the highest level of clinical cancer care in the region, access to the latest cancer research, and the benefits of a team-focused, multidisciplinary approach.

Breast cancer can be treated with local or systemic therapy. Some patients receive both kinds of treatment. Local therapy, which includes surgery and radiation therapy, is used to remove or destroy breast cancer in a specific area. Systemic treatments, which include chemotherapy and hormonal therapy, are used to destroy or control cancer throughout the body. Some patients have systemic therapy to shrink the tumor before local therapy. Others have systemic therapy to prevent the cancer from coming back or to treat cancer that has spread.

To learn more about breast cancer, visit aboutbreasthealth.com.

Surgery

Surgery is the most common treatment for breast cancer. There are two main objectives for surgery. The first is to remove the tumor. The second is to evaluate the lymph nodes to determine if the cancer has spread. To learn more about surgical treatment of breast cancer, please visit UofL Physicians-Surgical Oncology.

Radiation Therapy

Radiation therapy, or “radiotherapy,” uses high-energy X-rays or particles to destroy cancer cells. This treatment is used to kill any cancer cells remaining in the breast, chest wall or underarm area after breast-conserving surgery. It also may be needed after mastectomy in certain cases. Before you undergo radiation, a radiation oncologist and physicist plan the precise delivery of the radiation to minimize radiation to your vital organs and maximize the radiation to the affected area. To learn more about radiation therapy for breast cancer, please visit UofL Physicians-Radiation Oncology and Brown Cancer Center's Treatment Options page.

Chemotherapy

Chemotherapy uses drugs to destroy cancer cells. The drugs enter the bloodstream and travel throughout the body. Chemotherapy may be recommended to kill any remaining cancer cells following surgery or to control cancer growth and relieve symptoms. Most chemotherapy drugs are given intravenously or in pill form. For more information, please visit UofL Physicians-Medical Oncology/Hematology.

Hormonal Therapy

Hormonal therapy keeps cancer cells from getting the hormones they need to grow. It is used to treat cancers that are fed by estrogen – known as hormone receptor positive tumors. Like chemotherapy, hormonal therapy can affect cancer cells throughout the body.

Immunotherapy

The immune system is your body’s way of fighting disease. Immunotherapy helps this system control or kill cancer cells. Substances made by the body are used to boost, direct, or restore the body’s natural defenses against cancer.

Childhood Cancers

U.S. News & World Report has rated the UofL Physicians who treat childhood cancers among the best in the nation. These physicians provide our patients the latest state-of-the-art therapies, using treatment protocols sponsored by the National Cancer Institute from the Children's Oncology Group and other institutions. Our team of physicians, nurse practitioners, psychologists, social workers, chaplains, behaviorists and art, music and massage therapists work together to assure that our patients and their families are supported and nurtured. We understand how important it is to attend to the emotional needs created by the physical demands of treatment.

Our doctors also lead the region's only blood and marrow transplant program specifically for children. The Kosair Children's Hospital Bone Marrow Transplant Program is a member of the Pediatric Blood and Marrow Transplant Consortium, the Blood and Marrow Transplant Clinical Trials Network, and the Children's Oncology Group. To learn more, visit UofL Physicians-Pediatric Cancer & Blood Disesease.

Endocrine Tumors

Endocrine tumors are not very common, but they can cause problems for a patient by making hormones that affect the body in a negative way. In addition, endocrine tumors can be malignant (cancerous) and can spread to lymph nodes or other locations. Some endocrine tumors tend to occur together and run in families. Early diagnosis and treatment can prevent the spread of cancer or the negative effects of hormones on the body and can sometimes lead to the early diagnosis and treatment of other family members. For this reason, a tumor of the thyroid, parathyroid, or adrenal glands should be fully evaluated by a surgeon with experience in the area of endocrine tumors. For more information, please visit UofL Physicians-Surgical Oncology.

Gastrointestinal Cancers

Gastrointestinal cancers affects the organs of the digestive system – including the esophagus, gallbladder, large intestine (colon), small intestine, liver, pancreas, stomach, anus and rectum. Your treatment plan will depend on the location of your tumor, the stage of the cancer, your age, and your general health.

To learn more about liver cancer, visit aboutlivertumors.com.
To learn more about pancreatic cancer, visit about pancreascancer.com.

Treatment options for gastrointestinal cancers may include one or a combination of the following:

Surgery

Surgery to remove your tumor and some of the tissue around it can sometimes be performed. This procedure reduces the chance that the cancer will remain in your body. The type of surgery performed depends on the size and location of the tumor. To learn more about surgical treatment of gastrointestinal cancers, visit UofL Physicians-Surgical Oncology and UofL Physicians-Colon and Rectal Surgery.

Radiation Therapy

Radiation therapy, which is also called radiotherapy, uses high-energy rays to kill cancer cells. Before you undergo radiation, a radiation oncologist and physicist plan the precise delivery of the radiation to minimize radiation to your vital organs and maximize the radiation to the affected area. To learn more about radiation therapy, please visit UofL Physicians-Radiation Oncology.

Chemotherapy

Chemotherapy uses drugs to destroy cancer cells. The drugs enter the bloodstream and travel throughout the body. Chemotherapy may be recommended to kill any remaining cancer cells following surgery or to control cancer growth and relieve symptoms. Most chemotherapy drugs are given intravenously or by catheter. For more information, please visit UofL Physicians-Medical Oncology/Hematology.

Target Therapy

Target therapy is a process of stopping the development of a new blood vessel from forming in the cancer cells. It also blocks substances needed to slow down the growth of the tumor. This therapy is used primarily for the treatment of colon and rectal cancers – although it is also used to treat some pancreatic and liver cancers.

Genito-urinary Cancer

Nearly 60,000 people will be diagnosed this year with some form of genito-urinary cancer, which are cancers that affect the urinary tract, bladder, kidneys, prostate, testicles and penis. However, with accurate diagnosis and appropriate treatment, many will go on to enjoy long, productive lives.

UofL Physicians includes a renowned group of genito-urinary cancer specialists. Using a multidisciplinary approach to care, our focus is on treating the whole patient, so we offer every service available to help you and your loved ones deal with both the physical and emotional effects of cancer. We bring together specialists and technologists from every area pertinent to your circumstance to create a treatment plan tailored just for you. Your particular team will include medical oncologists, radiation oncologists, pathologists and other appropriate specialists.

Your treatment plan will depend on the location of the tumor, the stage of the cancer, your age, and your general health. Treatment options may include one or a combination of the following:

Surgery

Patients in good health are usually offered surgery as treatment for genito-urinary cancer. This surgery may include removing the cancer cells, tumor and/or surrounding tissue. If the cancer has progressed, some or the entire affected organ may be removed. For some patients, surgeons may be able to utilize the da Vinci Si surgical system to provide minimally invasive, ultra precise surgical treatment. To learn more, please visit UofL Physicians-Urology.

Radiation Therapy

Radiation therapy, which is also called radiotherapy, uses high-energy rays to kill cancer cells. Before you undergo radiation, a radiation oncologist and physicist plan the precise delivery of the radiation to minimize radiation to your vital organs and maximize the radiation to the affected area. To learn more about radiation therapy, please visit UofL Physicians-Radiation Oncology.

Immunotherapy/Biologic Therapy

Biologic therapy is a treatment that uses the patient’s immune system to fight cancer. Substances made by the body or made in a laboratory are used to boost, direct or restore the body’s natural defenses against cancer.

Chemotherapy

Chemotherapy uses drugs to destroy cancer cells. The drugs enter the bloodstream and travel throughout the body. Chemotherapy may be recommended to kill any remaining cancer cells following surgery or to control cancer growth and relieve symptoms. Most chemotherapy drugs are given intravenously or by catheter. For more information, please visit UofL Physicians-Medical Oncology/Hematology.

Cryosurgery

Cryosurgery is a treatment that uses an instrument to freeze and destroy cancer cells.

Hormonal Therapy

Hormonal therapy keeps cancer cells from getting the hormones they need to grow. Like chemotherapy, hormonal therapy can affect cancer cells throughout the body. In general, you will not suffer hair loss or many of the other side effects associated with chemotherapy.

High-intensity Focused Ultrasound

High-intensity focused ultrasound is a treatment that uses ultrasound (high-energy sound waves) to destroy cancer cells.

Gynecologic Oncology

UofL Physicians’ gynecology oncologists provide a progressive, comprehensive and compassionate approach to the care of women with gynecologic cancers. We are specially trained in the latest clinical modalities that are constantly enhanced by basic science and clinical research to treat all facets of the disease from diagnosis to surgery to chemotherapy. We individualize your care through the use of multidisciplinary teams of gynecologic oncologists and other medical experts such as radiation oncologists, pathologists, diagnostic radiologists, pain and palliative care physicians, oncology nurses and social workers.

Our patients have access to the latest treatments for ovarian, uterine, cervical, and vulvar cancers, as well as treatment of rare gynecologic cancers. UofL Physicians’ gynecology oncologists are on the forefront of minimally invasive surgical procedures, including the robot and laparoscope, that offer faster recovery times with less pain and lower risks of complications. To provide the best care, treatment is tailored to each patient and type of gynecologic cancer.

Our research focuses on the treatment of endometrial, cervical, ovarian, and vulvar cancers, as well as cervical dysplasia and gestational trophoblastic disease. Carefully chosen and monitored regional and national research trials are offered, as medically appropriate, to ensure patient access to leading-edge therapies.

To learn more, please visit UofL Physicians-Women’s Health. and the Brown Cancer Center.

Head and Neck Cancers

Nearly 50,000 people will be diagnosed with a form of head and neck cancer this year. Most head and neck cancers begin in the squamous cells that line the structures found in the head and neck. Squamous cells are flat cells that cover inside and outside surfaces of the body.

UofL Physicians play an integral role in the James Graham Brown Cancer Center’s Multidisciplinary Head & Neck Clinic, which is the first of its kind in Kentucky. The team, which includes specialists from surgical oncology, radiation oncology and medical oncology, meets regularly to monitor the patient’s progress carefully and to adjust the treatment plan as necessary. Additional support comes from dental oncology, speech pathology, nursing, a dietician, social worker, behavioral oncology and pharmacist, as well as other appropriate specialists.

This approach ensures that patients receive the ideal combination of treatments and therapies. This clinic allows our patients access to all three medical specialties under one roof at the same time in one location. The clinic offers state-of-the-art diagnostic and treatment approaches for advance head and neck cancers.

Treatment options may include one or a combination of the following:

Surgery

The first objective of surgery is to remove the tumor and some of the healthy tissue around it. This procedure reduces the chance that cancer cells will be left in the area. The second objective of surgery is to evaluate the lymph nodes, if your physician team suspects the cancer has spread. Surgery may be followed by radiation treatment or a combination of chemotherapy and radiation. To learn more, please visit UofL Physicians-ENT.

Radiation Therapy

Radiation therapy, which is also called radiotherapy, uses high-energy rays to kill cancer cells. Before you undergo radiation, a radiation oncologist and physicist plan the precise delivery of the radiation to minimize radiation to your vital organs and maximize the radiation to the affected area. Please visit UofL Physicians-Radiation Oncology.

Chemotherapy

Chemotherapy uses drugs to destroy cancer cells. The drugs enter the bloodstream and travel throughout the body. Chemotherapy may be recommended to kill any remaining cancer cells following surgery or to control cancer growth and relieve symptoms. Most chemotherapy drugs are given intravenously or by catheter. To learn more, please visit UofL Physicians-Medical Oncology/Hematology.

Lung Cancer

Lung cancer is cancer that forms in the tissues of the lung, usually in the cells lining the air passages. There are two main types of lung cancer -- small cell lung cancer and non-small cell lung cancer:

  • Small cell – this variety progresses more quickly and is more likely to spread beyond the lungs.?
  • Non-small cell – is the more common of the two. It is slower growing and less likely to spread to other organs of the body.

More than 200,000 new cases of lung cancer are diagnosed each year. The good news is, there is hope. With accurate diagnosis and appropriate treatment, many people diagnosed with lung cancer live long, meaningful lives. UofL Physicians are an integral part of the Brown Cancer Center’s Lung Cancer Clinic, providing the highest level of clinical cancer care in the region, access to the latest cancer research, and the benefits of a team-focused, multidisciplinary approach. This team-focused approach ensures that the clinical plan for each patient is customized and tailored to each individual patient and is comprehensive and coordinated.

The multidisciplinary team of lung cancer specialists includes a medical oncologist, surgical oncologist, pathologist and a radiation oncologist. Additional support comes from a pharmacist, dietician, social worker, behavioral oncologist and other appropriate specialists. Each team meets regularly to discuss the patient’s progress. This approach ensures that patients receive the ideal combination of treatments and therapies.

Your treatment plan will depend on the location of your tumor, the stage of the cancer, your age and your general health. To learn more about treatment options for lung cancers, please visit the Brown Cancer Center and UofL Physicians-Pulmonology.

Melanoma

Melanoma, the most lethal form of skin cancer, is the fifth most common cancer in American men and the seventh most common in American women, killing more than 8,000 Americans annually. Melanoma is an aggressive cancer that may be associated with changes in a mole, a skin tumor, and drainage from a mole. Melanoma can spread very early to the lymph nodes and then to the rest of the body.

UofL Physicians are an integral part of the James Graham Brown Cancer Center Multidisciplinary Melanoma Clinic, which takes a multidisciplinary approach to the delivery of cancer care with the region's pre-eminent team of experts in the field. We tailor our treatment plans to each patient's needs and take a coordinated, multidisciplinary approach to care. We offer a wide range of services, including screening, diagnosis and treatment options, for patients at every stage of melanoma. In addition, patients who have been treated elsewhere are offered follow-up or second opinions/options. We provide patients with melanoma and other skin conditions the latest and preferred treatment options. Patients with melanoma can go to one location -- our multidisciplinary clinic -- to see all the medical experts they need on the same day -- instead of multiple appointments at multiple locations. They leave with a treatment action plan and answers -- right away. To learn more, please visit aboutmelanoma.com and the Brown Cancer Center website.

Sarcoma

Sarcoma is an aggressive cancer that may be associated with swelling, formation of a lump or tumor and pain. Some sarcomas are on the arms or legs, while others are on the chest, abdomen, or even deep inside the abdomen. Sarcomas are very rare and often require a coordinated treatment plan that includes surgery, chemotherapy and radiation therapy. It is very important that the proper surgery be performed. Some patients with sarcoma need preoperative (before surgery) chemotherapy and radiation. Most patients are able to avoid radical amputations with the properly coordinated treatments. To learn more, visit UofL Physicians-Surgical Oncology.

Physicians in this practice may not see patients at all locations listed below. For details, please call the appointment line for the location you are interested in visiting.

To learn more, please contact the following:

Offices and Clinics

  • Children's Hospital Foundation Building (Childhood Cancers)
    601 S. Floyd St., #403
    Louisville, 40202
    502-629-7750
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  • James Graham Brown Cancer Center
    529 S. Jackson St.

    Louisville, 40202
    502-562-4673
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  • James Graham Brown Cancer Center (Medical Oncology)
    529 S. Jackson St.

    Louisville, 40202
    502-562-4158
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  • University Surgical Associates - Downtown (Surgical Oncology)
    401 E. Chestnut St.
    Suite 710
    Louisville, 40202
    502-583-8303
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  • University Surgical Associates - East End (Norton Medical Plaza)
    4950 Norton Healthcare Blvd.
    Suite 200
    Louisville, 40241
    502-583-8303
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  • James Graham Brown Cancer Center (Radiation Oncology)
    529 S. Jackson St.
    Louisville, 40202
    502-562-4360
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  • James Graham Brown Cancer Center (Gynecologic Oncology)
    529 S. Jackson St.
    Louisville, 40202
    502-561-7220
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Hospital Affiliations

  • University of Louisville Hospital
  • Jewish Hospital
  • Norton Hospitals
  • Kosair Children’s Hospital

Visit UofL Physicians related practice pages to find physicians who treat various types of cancer:

Colon and Rectal Surgery

Cardio-Oncology

Ear, Nose and Throat

Gynecology Oncology

Medical Oncology/Hematology

Pathology

Pediatric Cancer and Blood Diseases

Pulmonology

Radiation Oncology

Radiology

Surgical Oncology

Urology

Or, go to the "Find a Physician Search" and search by symptom or condition for "Cancer."

Next Steps

For more information or to make an appointment,
call 502-588-6000